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Costa Brava Living - blog area

Walks and other things

Walks on the Costa Brava - will be updated as more are added - click for a larger version This is our blog about living in the Costa Brava. We like to visit places. We walk (a lot) particularly into and around the Gavarres. Sometimes we travel around on bike. In the summer, we swim and canoe.
 

The walks have been walked since November 2012, and we originally added one or two a week but have slowed down now as we repeat walks, but we add updates if any important details have changed. The photos are straight from the original walk or activity. We like to make circular walks and our walks range in length from about 4km (an hour) to around 16km (four hours) - but probably about 2 1/2 hours on average - though if you want to reduce the length, there are usually shortcuts. The map on the right shows where the walks are and will be updated as we continue to add more. To our surprise, the blog was also mentioned in the Sunday Times' Essential Costa Brava (Feb 2017).

The entries on swimming and beaches also start from Summer 2013. Unlike the walks which are reported as we did them (including photos), for the swimming and beach articles we're planning to update the details and pictures over time.
 

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Perpignan (and rugby)
22 Jan 2014

Perpignan centre - Le Castillet Perpignan is the closest French city to the Costa Brava and is reachable in about 80 minutes from where we live. In distance terms it's closer than Barcelona which means that when we want something special, travelling to France is another possibility.

Perpignan itself was originally an important Catalan town, part of the old Catalan county of Roussillon and only became French in 1659. As a result modern Perpignan and the local area style themselves as being part of Catalunya Nord with signs in both French and Catalan (not Spanish) and there is a strong affinity for Catalonia. However, it also has a strong French feel and there is definite change when you cross the border.

One of the visible changes is that you see rugby posts in the sports fields. Like many places in the south of France, people around Perpignan are fanatical about rugby and Perpignan itself has not one professional rugby team, but two. For rugby union there is the USAP (Union Sportive des Arlequins de Perpignan) who play in the French premier rugby league (Top 14), and for rugby league the Catalan Dragons who play as the only non-English club in the Super League for rugby league.

Perpignan Place de la Republic Coming from the West Country, I was brought up on rugby rather than football and as it happens Gloucester, which used to be our local rugby club was playing Perpignan in the pan-European Heineken Cup competition so this was a chance to get to see my old home team once more.

Unfortunately on the Spanish side of the border, rugby is still very much a minor sport in Catalonia. There is only one club for the Costa Brava - Senglars in Torroella de Montgri, and there is one in Girona. Barcelona has more across the city, and is trying to increase participation with help from USAP, and about four years ago, USAP came down to Barcelona to play Toulon in the Heineken cup at the Olimpic Stadium with 55,000 spectators, much to the city's surprse.

Perpignan Palace of the Kings of Majorca Before we watched the rugby, we took a brief walk around the main town. It's actually a place we visit reasonably often. The shopping is different from the Spanish side of hte border - many French products don't make it across the frontier and there is generally a better selection of produce, and a different selection of goods and a different style and range and though prices tend to be a little higher in France, there are still some bargains for cross-border consumption.

We parked near the rugby stadium (Aime Giral) which is to the south of the city and about a 7-8 minute stroll to the city centre. As we were walking up into town, lots of cherry-and-white Gloucester supporters were walking towards the stadium the other way. One tradition with many rugby teams, and USAP is no different, is that there is hospitality for visiting fans through the morning and the stadium itself has a number of bars and lounges for eating around the bottom for members and visitors.

Perpignan Palace of the Kings of Majorca inner court yard Our route took us over the river (the Tech) and then into town in front of the Castillet. This is a large red-brick castle/town gate that marks the entrance to the old city area. This is just across the canalised river Basse. From this point a network of old streets and buildings form the heart of the old town, most of which have been converted to plush shops or restaurants. There is plenty to explore, but we walk through the older section to emerge by the Place de la Republic, a large square with a merry-go-round in it and bars and restaurants all around.

We then head upwards in terms of height in among the smaller streets of houses. Unfortunately the houses and area is a little run down and there is dog-mess all over the pavements (a problem we found all over Perpignan). Going up we reach the outer walls of the great Vauban fortification that surrounds the Palace of the Kings of Majorca - another ciutadella or fort construction built as a response to the annexation of this part of Catalonia in the 17th century.

River in the centre of Perpignan The walls, like the other forts in Catalona - Salses, Figueres, Roses, Girona, are massive and we skirt around the outside to find the entrance. The scale of the building is surprising - particularly as it took us several visits to realise it was there. But it doesn't stop. A gate passes through the outer walls and a broad flight of shallow steps runs up inside the wall emerging at an open level giving great views over the city and out to the mountains of Corbiere towards Narbonne, and to Canigou and the Pyrenees.

But we're not finished. Another shallow set of steps reaches the top and we reach the topmost building - the Palace of the Kings of Majorca - a much older Catalan castle/palace built when Jaume II King of Majorca (and son of the King of Aragon) made Perpignan the capital of the Kingdom of Majorca in 1276. We go inside just to take the picture, but we're on a schedule for the rugby so we don't have time to visit more thoroughly this time.

We walk back down into the old city and out past the Palais de Justice and along the canalised river back towards the stadium. Being a Sunday a few food places are open but all the main shopping is closed. On a Saturday this is a thriving shopping area with all the standard French high-street stores like Fnac.

And so to the rugby. What might be surprising is that USAP's club song is sung in Catalan, a Lluis Llach standard that our children learnt in school here. The game is good natured with calls of USAP matched by the sound of visiting supporters chanting Glo..st..er in the long west country accent. Gloucester won 18-36.

See also: Andorra La Vella - Figueres and Castell de Sant Ferran - Girona - Festa Major of Sant Narcis - Puigcerda and Bourg-Madame - Cadaques and Port Lligat

Also in France close to the Costa Brava

White water rafting in Quillan (France) - Collioure (France) - Villefranche-de-Conflent and Mont-Louis (France) - Elne (France) - Ceret (France) - Andorra La Vella

Corça, Planils and Cassa de Pelras
16 Jan 2014

Cassa de Pelras church Costa Brava Corça is one of the Costa Brava villages from La Bisbal d'Emporda in the direction of Flaça (for the train station) and on to Girona. The old village is set back from the road and it would be easy to miss just our full of charm and character it has as you rush past in the car. We've walked from Corça on the northern side of the village (Corça, Casavells, Matajudaica). This was an opportunity to fill in a gap out towards Pubol and Flaça.

We start on the Sant Cristina side of the road and park by the Sala Municipal. In contrast to the old village on the other side of hte main road, the Sant Cristina side of Corça is a residential area mainly made up of modern housing in a mix of terraces and detached houses on a small hill with views back to La Bisbal and up to the Gavarres above Monells so not too much to see. We head to the top of Sant Cristina and then onto a track that runs past a football field. At the far side of the football field we take a left following the diret track that is signed as the bike route for Pubol. (For most of this walk we found ourselves on bike routes, but mostly off road).

Fortified masia farmhouse in Planils We wander down the track with a field on one side and woods on the other before crossing a small stream on stepping stones. The path then emerges at a small tarmacked road by a farmhouse. The road is very very quiet so there is no problem following it along a small stream past fields and the occasional copice of birch trees. At one point we see a deep shaft just by the side of the road and looking on the map it seems this was once an area used for mining - though there is little other evidence.

The road is rural and quiet and we reach a collection of three or four large masias that make up the hamlet of Planils, first two next to each other, then a third which looks older with towers like a castle a little further on. We're still on tarmac and just after the last masia a dirt track goes to the left and the map shows a more off road route. So we follow the track and then head into the woods a little further on.

Corca view to church We continue through the woods for about a kilometre following sheep tracks in the soft soil, until the track reaches a tarmac road again where we turn right. We go down and then up the other side of a valley to the first of the masias of Cassa de Pelras. The masias here are large in a slighly darker stone with few windows to the road so they look quite intimidating. At the masia we turn left, then take the next right - again a track - which takes us to the cluster of buildings around the church.

The church is small and there is a slightly odd bank of three stairs separate from the church (made in 1908 according to the plaque on it), that would have been used by musicians for village fesitvities in older times. It's worth walking around the church as there are two small plaças in an area that only has about three buildings. Cassa sits on top of a ridge which separates the valleys of the river Daro (La Bisbal's river), from the valley of the river Ter.

From Cassa we head slightly north to meet the main C66 road - this is to reach another footpath and avoid walking along the busy road. We reach the bus stop and cross then take the path to the right of the house in front of us. We're in fields again and there are views now to the north across the Empordan Plain and across to Montgri.

Corca village square outside old walled centre As we approach an old farmhouse we notice on the map that our next path is actually very close, so we try cutting through the farmyard to make the connection. Unfortunately we can't find a route through, but some neighbours walking dogs show us a route that involves jumping over two walls to reach the path and road on the other side. On our map, we'd recommend taking the genuine dotted line path.

We are now back on a cycle path and a gentle down hill  walk through a mix of fields and woods down to Corça, emerging at the main C66 a little ahead of the village just by the Mas Pastor restaurant. However, we don't have to walk along the road as there's a separate path back to the village that connects to a small road towards the older heart of  Corça.

We've described the older part of Corça before, but it remains an interesting and intriguing village of terraced houses and an inner walled centre. On the side of the village closest to the road is a delightful square with plane trees just by the river and restaurants and cafes (quiet when we went past).

We cross the road via the underpass under the school and get back to the car.

Neighbouring walks: Corça, Casavells, Matajudaica - La Bisbal, Vulpellac, Castell d'Emporda, Fonteta - Rupia and Foixa - Cruilles, Monells and Sant Sadurni de l'Heura - La Pera, Pubol and around - Madremanya, Els Angels, Sant Marti Vell

Walking route - Corca, Planils and Cassa de Pelras

Girona valley of Sant Daniel
16 Jan 2014

Girona view of the Cathedral from the watch tower above Sant Daniel During the walk last year that we did up to the castle of Sant Miquel in the Gaverres (Girona and Castell de St Miquel), we didn't take any photos. This is a short walk in to the valley of Sant Daniel behind the cathedral. For its proximity to the city, it's still amazing to think how quickly you can get into open countryside and farms and rural buildings.

We took the northern road into Girona down past Pont Major towards the centre and parked by the river just below Montjuic to save having to navigate Girona's one-way system. From here we walked under the railway into the older part to where the old walls meet the road up to Montjuic (and up to Girona's Ciutadella).  We then head up on the right hand side of the Sant Daniel valley to the Jardins de John Lennon which climb up to the city wall. At the top is a gap in the wall with signposting to the Torre Sutxet and viewpoint as there are excellent views across to the cathedral.

We follow the path past the old tower, then along the side of the hill as it curves around the corner giving views out to the Gavarres. The path curls around to the head of the next valley and some executive housing and we come down the hill past a farm and in towards the Monastery of Sant Daniel.

Girona Sant Daniel valley and monastery Crossing the stream at the bottom through a small park we start going up past a small font and then follow a dirt track up to the top of the cathedral side of the valley and along to the city walls. Finding an appropriate point through the walls we can then enter the old city from close to the Casa del Alemanys. When the city was founded in Roman times the wall from Alemanys down to the Cathedral would have been the extent of Girona on this side, and from Alemanys down the lane, the left hand extent of what was a tiny triangular city by comparison to today.

Not a long walk, but something to provide a different perspective to Girona to the old streets and modern shops.

Neighbouring walks: Girona and Castell de St Miquel - Girona - Festa Major of Sant Narcis - Celra, Juia and the Castle of Palagret - Roman fort at St Julia de Ramis (Girona) - Girona cyclepath to the coast - Bescano, River Ter and free-style kayaking - Girona Temps de Flors

Walking route for Girona valley of Sant Daniel

Figueres and Castell de Sant Ferran
02 Jan 2014

Figueres Costa Brava castle of Sant Ferran Figueres is the second major inland town for the Costa Brava after Girona. It is also the first main Catalan town from France and so has something of a border-town feel to it with a blend of cross-border shopping and the feeling of a French influence. As a town, it is most famous as the location of the Dali Museum - an elaborate surrealist palace created by Dali from the old theatre in Figueres.

For visitor to Figueres, the town is somewhat ecletic. The Dali Museum is excellent and strongly worth visiting, both from the outside with eggs and golden figures perching above the museum walls and scupltures balanced on columns of tyres, or from the inside where you can see paintings, sculptures and jewelry by Dali (though not the most famous Dali painting - 'The Persistence of Memory' with the melting watches). Around the museum area is a small network of streets with fancy shops and restaurants almost in a French style, and there is a large Rambla and market nearby.

Figueres Costa Brava castle of Sant Ferran from other side However, outside the heard of the town Figueres can appear a little drab with lots of oversize apartment blocks built in an 1970s style, with the classic Spanish style of tall buildings with empty panelled walls waiting for the neighbouring buildings to fill in the gaps. In general, it feels like the town is improving over time, but the process seems slow and there are still unkept corners.

Away from the main town centre, there are larger shopping centres and retail parks out towards Roses. The French influence can be felt and there is usually some different shopping than in Girona or further south with more products, visitors and French home-owners close to Figueres and across to Roses.

Figueres Dali Museum from rear As an aside, in general the range of products in Catalan supermarkets is lower than for the UK or France and it can be difficult to find certain product lines, or where they do exist they can be very expensive and occasionally we need to go to France to find certain products because they aren't common or popular in Spain. To us it's always a surprise at how little French food crosses the border. So we often go to France to stock up on cordials and squash, or to find joints of meat, duck, and at Christmas a range of traditional Christmas foods including turkeys (though they can be found here if you know where to look), spices and certain herbs or food ingredients, or certain types of electrical goods.

For other visitors, Figueres now also boasts two train stations - the main station is the older slow line that connects to Port Bou to the north on the French border and to Girona and Barcelona to the south. This is relatively close to the centre - to get to the Dali Museum is just a trip across the market square, and around the corner and one street further on.

Figueres Dali Museum from the front The second station is the brand new station for the modern high-speed AVE line at Vilafant that links Perpignan through the tunnel through the Pyrenees to Barcelona and then Madris with TGV type trains (Paris is about 5 hours away). Though the Vilafant station is a little further out compared to the main station, it's still only about 1.5km from the centre of Figueres.

Figueres main church The main reason of our visit though was to see the Castle of Sant Ferran (Ferdinard in Spanish). This is obviously less well known than the Dali Museum, but really would count as the second tourist attraction, The Castle is low sunk fortress that sits on the hill above Figueres behind the hospital. It's very very big - more than 3km to walk all around the outside with large brick and earthwork walks built in a complex pattern of triangles and bastions. It dates from 1750s, built in response to the loss of the Chateau de Bellegarde at Le Perteus in the 1690s after a series of wars and skirmishes between the French and Spanish in the 17th Century including an independent Catalonia under Pau Claris with French protection. For historical context, this was the time of Louis XIV and the scheming Cardinal Richlieu of Three Muskateers fame.

Unfortunately when we arrived the main central part of the castle was closed. The times outside said the castle should be open until 3pm, but it seemed to allow the last visitors in just after 2pm. As a result we had to make do with looking in at the castle from the path that runs around the outside

Figueres Rambla Having only seen the outer walls from the Autopista were the castle seemed a little neglected, in fact close up the castle is well maintained. The low defensive structures that give this impression as the castle is built into the ground almost reminiscent of a neolithic fort with deep gullies and lines of brick-faced earthenwork walls. At the time it was constructed, the power of cannon offenses and the growing size of armies meant the older tall keep and high walled medieval castles that are common in the UK, were too easily breeched. And while the UK broadly stopped building castles in Tudor times, moving instead to more stately homes, on the continent borders, invasions and rebellions remained a real possibility (in the UK, the ports defences are probably the most similar to the massive earthwork forts than can be found in Catalonia). Ciutadellas and massive forts can be found at Salses, Mont-Louis and Confluent in French Catalonia, and at Roses, Girona and Barcelona in addition to Figueres on the Spanish side of the border.

Figueres figure of Saint George and Dragon in marketplace The castle itself is enormous. It's takes 30-40 minutes to walk the 3km around the walls and we saw several people using it as a jogging route. (By way of contrast Warwick Castle is approximately 420m around the walls.) More surprising were the views from the castle with clear views to Roses (which has it's own enormous Ciutadella) and up to Bellegarde on the pass to France. The location close to the French border also made it an important staging post for the mass exodus of people as they fled the Spanish Civil War. The castle itself was the site of the last meeting of the Republican government prior to Franco's victory.

Figueres square and town From the viewpoint the road runs straight down to the Dali Museum in the town. The museum is a mix of extravagancies with a glass sphere, giant white eggs and golden figures rising above pink walls that have yellow elements that look like brioche loafs studding the wall. The museum sits in the centre of the town, very close to the church and there is a contrast with the plainer white architecture of the main Figueres church. The main entrance is via a placa behind the church full of curiosities and sculptures which the main entrance clearly showing the buildings' heritage as an old theatre. Dali himself built the museum in the 1960s so it's very much a homage to his vision, rather than a collectors type museum, and that makes it much more fun. We've visited several times but didn't go in this time.

Around the Museum area, are smart streets with shops and restaurants that eventually lead to the main Rambla - a very broad promenade in the centre of the town. From here, the last area to see is the market area which joins the street at the bottom of the Rambla in the direction of the main (older) station with more sculptures and a floating cover for the market.

See also: Girona (Festa Major of Sant Narcis) - Peralada - Visit to Besalu and Banyoles - La Jonquera to Fort de Bellegarde (France) - Llança - Cadaques and Port Lligat  - Port de la Selva - Sant Pere de Rodes - Roses and Roses Ciutadella - Waterfall at Les Escaules (Boadella) - Girona valley of Sant Daniel

Celra, Juia and the Castle of Palagret
29 Dec 2013

Celra La Fabrica factory Costa Brava Travelling from Girona to La Bisbal on the C66 route to the Costa Brava, the road and railway line passes through Celra, Bordils and then to Flaça. From the main road, the towns look as if they are just a line of houses and shops built along the road and so seem quite plain motor suburbs for Girona. In fact, as with many towns in Catalonia, the view from the main road is deceptive. All of the towns are actually based around much older village centres, but each centre itself is around one to two kilometres away from the main road and away from the Barri d'Estacio - the estates, modern buildings and industrial units located close to the train station. For instance, many people who catch the train to Flaça to connect to the Costa Brava don't realise that there is actually an older and more interesting part to the town which is separate from the main station area. 

We mentioned Celra's modernista factory in our walk around Sant Julia de Ramos and we'd not visited Juia before this weekend, so it was a chance to explore up into a different part of the Gavarres, so needing to be in Bordils for a sports tournament we decided to take the opportunity to explore Celra and Juia.

Celra street in the old part We parked and started in Celra just by the station and the old modernista factory. The factory itself (La Fabrica) is built in red brick with large windows and two old chimneys and is reminiscent of the harbour buildings on Gloucester old docks. It was a chemicals factory in the past originally for chemicals for the tanning industry, but it's now been coverted into a social centre, town library, and is also the location of an outdoor municipal swimming pool.

Celra view fromthe Gavarres behind the town We walked from the station up towards the old town and into the nucleas of older buildings just along from the town theatre - a building in an 1930s style, so probably from that time. The inner part of the town is much older with stone built buildings along narrow streets that curl around to the church. The older part seems quite large for a village suggesting that the older town would have been an important centre at one point. We follow the older alleys up towards the higher parts just under the Gavarres Hills past horta (vegetable gardens) and lemon trees. On the outskirts is more of a mix of older and more modern houses that look well-appointed for commuters to Girona, and then large masias dotted about looking over the fields around the village.

Our path continues up past Mas Castell, a square built masia with a tower in the center, its stonework fully restored and golden in the sun. Around the side of the mas the path heads up into the woods and we find our first signpost. We can either continue up, or take the track marked to Juia down by the stream. We follow the path to Juia, but soon take a right hand turn up the hill on a broad forestry track. This is an area popular with mountain bikers and every so often one or two come downhill past us.

The path continues up and as we climb we can see the castle of Sant Miquel on the neighbouring ridge (see Girona walk). We continue an easy-going climb through the woods, with views back across the plain of the Ter and the factory buildings of Celra behind us.

Castle of Palagret ruins behind Celra and Juia After what seems a longer time than we were expecting and almost at the top of the hill, our track joins with another broader path at a fork. We turn to the left down the track just a two mountain bikers are coming up - it seems like a long climb, but they don't seem to notice. This path will lead us down to the castle and the views are excellent, firstly out to the sea and Montgri and then across to the Pyrenees - a line of snow clearly visible, with the top of Canigo shrouded in cloud.

The path takes us down the next valley from the one we walked up with the Sanctuari of Els Angels on top of the hill opposite. Close to the bottom the road takes a right hand bend and we get to the ruins of the castle of Palagret. Little more than a few walls and some arched door ways remain of the building which sits above a moat hewn out of the rocks. The castle is being renovated and a wooden bridge with metal handrails takes us into the main keep area. Other stairs have been added and it's possible to walk through the rooms and up to the top of the castle for the view of the valley.

After a brief break we continue the last part of the downhill and on past some terraced fields and a stream close to old masias. We could walk straight back to Celra, but our planned route takes us along the Cami de Juia to the right. As we pass the last gate before returning to the woods we see what looks like a dragon's nest made from reeds wrapped around two trees obviously made for children.

Juia village and view The path curves through the woods and then gently rolls down to the old village of Juia emerging at an imposing farmhouse with views of the church. Juia is a small village/hamlet almost all of original older stone houses nestling together along a small streamway.

The path back to Celra follows the road, but is separated as a combined footpath, cyclepath and bridleway and we pass more perfectly restored farmhouses. At the outskirts of Celra we are back among more modern buildings and a number of apartment blocks as the outskirts of Celra is more modern with estate type houses. Then along past the older centre once more and back to the car.

Neighbouring walks: Girona and Castell de St Miquel - Roman fort at St Julia de Ramis (Girona) - Madremanya, Els Angels, Sant Marti Vell - Bordils and the tree plantations of the Ter - Rupia and Foixa - Sant Jordi Desvalls, Colomers and Sant Llorenç de les Arenes

Walking route from Celra to Juia via the ruined castle of Palagret

Canet d'Adri
26 Dec 2013

Canet dAdri under Rocacorba hills Canet d'Adri sits in the hills behind Girona that separate Girona from Olot and includes the outskirts of the Garotxa, the land of ancient volcanoes formed when the Spanish Penisular (which is geologically part of Africa) ran into the European continental plate.

It's an area we haven't explored very much, so a bright sunny Boxing Day seemed a good chance to walk off Christmas Dinner and to try off a new walking map of the Girona area from the ICC and it happens there's a 'green star' on the map indicating 'natural curiosity, beauty spot' - the Gorgues de la Font de la Torre.

Walking a new area without really knowing what the routes are is always interesting - sometimes it's just pot luck as to whether we find something worth visiting or just discover there would be somewhere better to walk for next time. We park just across the road from the old Ajuntament building and walk down the lane towards the river. The map marks two bridges as being of interest and we walk down to the first one. The bridge isn't so interesting, but it sits above a rocky gorge. From the map we had wondered if we could make a route along the river, but the path is marked as private, so we have to go back up towards the village and follow the official footpath past mainly newer houses and a new looking sports centre.

Canet dAdri pools and gorge The path down to the Font de la Torre is easy to find beneath a large old almost warehouse-looking masia, and steps take us down to rocky pools, waterfalls and two streams cutting through the rock in narrow gorges. The area is obviously popular and metal rails run along side the paths. On the opposite corner is a large waterwheel standing above the water now as decoration rather than a working wheel and some of the pools are deep and clear with vertical sides. Under an old bridge, the streams fall away in a series of water falls down through the cut to a river below.

Having chased across the rocks and pools and along the streams, we decide to try to follow the stream at the back into the woods and hills. The path is narrow and haphazard and we skip across the rocks to the other side of the stream to try to find a better route, but the path is the same. The sides are initially like walls but with large ferns growing out of them giving the path a jurassic feel.

Canet dAdri bridge over cutting As we continue, we're not so sure if the path we're walking really is a path and not wanting to get too deeply into the woods and hills as this is a relatively remote area with few roads or routes, we find a path up the side of the stream to the right and reach a forestry garage/picnic area and a track that takes us out to the road close to Can Canet.

We take the track back down before taking a left towards Can Nadal (it is Christmas). This looks like a colonies house and as we get closer we follow the sign that points to Administracio and up into the woods. The idea for the second part of the walk is to visit the old volcano just behind Canet d'Adri, but the paths aren't too clear. We follow the track at the back of Can Nadal into the woods until it emerges at a newly ploughed field.

Someone has driven across the field and so there is a track, and the track exists on the map so we chance it and reach the woods up on the far side. The path takes us past Can Pou (Pou is a well in Catalan), through the woods and out at more of a road on the other side. As we emerge we see the sign from the road says the track we were on was a Pas Particular - a private road. This is something we find regularly - an open path from one end is marked as private from the other. Unfortunately the maps don't distinguish between private and public tracks or routes.

Old village of Adri We continue down the road to the back of the volcano. As we reach the junction we see the signpost for a bigger walk up to Rocacorba and Puigsou. Looking up we can see the arial masts above the cliffs on top of the mountain behind us - so something for another day. We're at the back of the Puig of the old volcano and there are several families walking so we follow the road around the back of the Puig (it means 'hill' in Catalan). There are many isolated masia farmhouses and as is common around Girona, several have been restored as large family restaurants. Sunday lunch at a country masia is very popular for locals - much more than going to the coast or eating in town.

We keep following the road around to Adria a small hamlet of large old houses and a small church that stands above a wooded valley. In the distance we can look out to Girona and the Gavarres. The houses are built in the traditional golden stone of the region and many have been fully restored. 

Though there is a route up to the puig, according to the map there are no routes over the puig and down the other side so we stick to the road as it curves around the base of the Puig finding rocks of pumice along the side of the road. We pass through woods and have more views towards Girona and see the newly erected pylons for the MAT electricity line that is going to be bringing electricity from France as far as Barcelona. MAT (Molt Alta Tensio) is controversial because of the visual impact of the pylons and lines and there are many 'no-MAT' signs and posters in this part of Girones. This is the first time we've actually seen the pylons and they are larger than normal, but not the only pylons in the landscape.

Around the hill we return to Canet d'Adri. We would normally visit the village centre and church, but the older part of the village looks to be just the church and a house, so we return to the car and back towards Girona.

Other visits: Arbucies autumn walk - Visit to Roda de Ter and Espinelves - Visit to Setcases - Visit to Besalu and Banyoles - Serinya and Illa del Fluvia - Banyoles lakeside walk - Sant Miquel de Fluvia - Bascara - horses, fords and lost - Cervia de Ter - Waterfall at Les Escaules (Boadella)- Bescano, River Ter and free-style kayaking

Walking route around Canet dAdri

Santa Susanna de Peralta and Sant Climent de Peralta
16 Dec 2013

Sant Climent de Peralta church Costa Brava Just inland from the main Costa Brava coast, between La Bisbal d'Emporda and Llofriu, just after Vulpellac are the two tiny Peralta hamlets - Santa Susanna de Peralta on one side of the road and Sant Climent de Peralta on the other. Both hamlets are very small, but they extend to include a number of very big, and luxurious, old Masia estates with extensive grounds and stables.

Santa Susanna is the larger of the two hamlets and was the starting point of walks to Peratallada and to Clots de Sant Julia. It's the site of a now ruined castle that sits behind a restored masia house. Sant Climent, on the other side of the main road is little more than the church, but has a network of roads leading to very large masias into the Gavarres hills. The church looks like the perfect place to start for a walk, but there is just one road and that leads to a big gate for one of the big estates, so you can't go further on.

View out the Pyrenees from the Gavarres Costa Brava This is actually the second attempt at this walk. The first time we got lost and confused as there are many many tracks, particularly as you get into the hills and it can be very difficult to decipher where you are on the map. We park close to the social area for Santa Susanna. This is right next to a set of three traditional haystacks with hay layered around a central pole. These are visible from the main road, so an indication of where to turn if you want to park.

We walk down the lane and then cross the main road taking care as the cars are fast here. The lane continues on the other side of the road (Cami de Sant Climent), along past the fields with the church of Sant Climant to the left. In early medieval times this would have been a more important area as Sant Climent once boasted a monestary to complement the now ruined castle at Sant Susanna.

The lane continues past a large estate on the right and in the distance we can see snow on the Pyrenees clearly in the bright December light. The masia estates are huge in this area and a searching after the walk I found some of the masias on sale for prices from €5 to €28million.

Water pond in the hills behind Sant Climent de Peralta The lane splits at a smaller masia and we take the dirt track to the left rather than follow the tarmac road. The paths are getting a little confusing on the map so we just follow the one main track past a barn and then along the boundary edge of another large estate in the woods. The boundary is marked with very strong keep out and beware of the dogs signs and would be the back of the estate with the private road leading from Sant Climent church.

The path turns to the left and starts to climb into the hills. As we get higher we can see the Empordan plain spreading out beneath us framed by the mountains in the background. The woods are typical of the Gavarres, all alzina and cork pines. Cork being the main export of this area until the arrival of tourism. We're on the north side of the Gaverres and the ground is moist and leafy - very different in feel to the dry south facing walk above Castell d'Aro last week.

Mas Frigola As we get deeper into the woods and closer to the top of the hill we know we need to turn off. The problem though is finding the right path and keeping track of where we are. There are dozens of tracks and routes in this part of the Gavarres, many used for hunting or forestry. If you're familiar with what leads where it is easy to link and follow routes. But when we're in a new part of the woods for the first time it can be difficult to work out how the paths link through the folds and valleys of the hills. We don't get lost in the sense of not being able to get back, but it is easy to get lost in the sense of not finding quite the path we were looking for.

So close to the top of the hill we take a right down a smaller track following the trail of some cyclists (this area is fabulous for rough cycling) and curve around the side of the hill and down to a stream valley. The valley is shaded and chilly in contrast to the sun on the top. We walk down the track following the stream until we emerge by a big stone rectangular man-made pond by a font. After being in the deepest woods it's a surprise to suddenly find an unusual man-made structure.

As we walk past we can now see a masia up to our right. The path continues around the masia and then we get to a chain across the path. It isn't clear if the chain is stopping us going on, or is there to prevent other people coming in our direction. Since we have no obvious alternatives we carry straight on and the track seems to be part of the drive to the masia. At the end is a half open gate and we get back to the main tarmac road near a huge mas slightly elevated above the fields.

Traditional haystacks at Santa Susanna de Peralta Costa Brava We could take the tarmac road back to where we started but we carry straight on along the gravel track, and then immediately right taking us around the back of the elevated masia. The last time we did this walk, we missed this turning and ended up walking high in to the hills. The track curls around through fields and pieces of woodland. It's easy to follow and quite sandy underfoot.

As we pass a house to the left we hear the sound of bells like those used for sheep or cows. As we turn the corner we meet a man with a gun and two hunting dogs with bells around their necks. The bells are used to keep track of the dogs in the undergrowth when out hunting boar.

The track is easy and we walk at the back of two more enormous masia estates with swimming pools and stables. The number of horses in this area, it's a surprise there isn't a racecourse nearby.

The path reaches the main road just by the side of the Pordamsa porcelin factory. From the main road this is a grand glass and steel fronted building, but from the side on the track we're on it's a little more plain with a simple red-brick factory type structure.

It would be good if we could avoid the main road, but there are no paths back to Santa Susanna except by walking along the side of the busy route. We turn back up the lane we started from, just taking the time to inspect the strange bricked cave that we ignored on the way out.

 Neighbouring walks: Clots de Sant Julia (Vulpellac) - Palau-sator and Peratallada - Llofriu, St Llop and Torrent - Mont-ras to Fitor and on to Fonteta and Vulpellac - La Bisbal, Vulpellac, Castell d'Emporda, Fonteta

 Size = 581 x 877

Castell d'Aro and estate of Mas Nou
12 Dec 2013

Castle in Castell dAro Costa Brava Castell d'Aro is a small Costa Brava town situated at the end of the Aro valley just up from Platja d'Aro on the coast - officially the area is Castell-Platja d'Aro and the village of Castell d'Aro is the older original village centre before the widespread influx of tourism. Being named after a castle, it's no surprise that the town has a small older part with the Castell de Benedormiens located next to the church. The castle is now a museum of dolls (Museu de la Nina).

The village itself is at the base of the Gavarres and the hills climb to estates at the top that look over the Aro valley as it comes into the Costa Brava from the direction of Llagostera, and out to sea across the bay of Platja d'Aro. The old village centre is relatively small despite the presence of the castle, though well-preserved. Just down from the castle are more modern areas including a train track and one of the old carrilet trains that used to connect Sant Feliu to Guixols to Girona.

Views from Castell dAro Mas Nou Our aim was to explore the hills and get a glimpse of the views, but it would be fair to say there wasn't much at the top of the hill other than an obstructive golf course and the American-style villa houses.

Our route starts in the town with a tour of the older parts then heads up the valley to find a right hand link up the hill. It's marked as a white road ont he map, but as we often find, these white routes often turn out to be gravel tracks. We walk up the track and slowly behind us we get views across the valley, out to S'Agaro and the beach at Sant Pol. The day isn't particularly clear for landscape photographs though.

The climb up is steady and the day is surprisingly warm in the sun for December, but there is nothing particularly special about the path and few distractions or other routes off. As we get to the top, the route splits with the bigger track continuing to the left and a smaller track going straight on. We follow the straight on route which flattens out around with a steepish drop and views across the hills. Unfortunately, though it looks as if the track is well used, at the end it is blocked by a gate and fencing surrounding one of the greens of a golf course. The map had shown the route continuing so it's quite a big let down.

Houses in Mas Nou above Castell dAro Instead we double back to the nearest clearing and spot red markers and a small semi-overgrown track. We follow the track into the woods and undergrowth and it curves around the upper part of a small valley, arriving at the back of some houses in the Mas Nou estate. The estate has views to the south and down the coast and the high rises of Platja d'Aro are hidden by the curve of the hill. Most of the houses look enormous, built in the style of American estate houses.

We're on tarmac now and follow the road path up and along towards the TV-mast. One problem with estates is they tend to curve and run up and down so it can be difficult to spot where the right turning is. We continue around the estate but beyond admiring the gardens, there's not that much to see. So we take the first right and wander back down (looking at the map now, if we'd taken the following right we'd have had a different route down). The road seems to be curling back to our starting point, but we find a track at the bottom and navigate a path, again overgrown and little used, back down the hillside. Eventually we rejoin the path we went up and return back to Castell d'Aro feeling disappointed both by the way the upper path was blocked, but also disappointed by the quality of the walk.

Neighbouring walks: Calonge (Cami de Molins and over Cabanyes) - Platja d'Aro and S'Agaro - Romanya de la Selva - Romanya de la Selva to Puig d'Arques - Solius, rocks for climbing and ruined castle - Platja Sant Pol to Sant Feliu de Guixols - Romanya de la Selva to Platja d'Aro via Golf d'Aro Mas Nou

Walking route Castell dAro to Mas Nou

One year of walks and activities
02 Dec 2013

It's now one year since we started this blog. Eighty five things later and we still have more to explore, but hopefully it provides some insight into the rich variety of things to do on the Costa Brava.

We should also note the things we didn't do, or write about - the Festa d'Indianer in Begur in September for instance (it was raining on the Saturday night when we were planning to visit), Carnesoltes/Carneval in Palamos or Platja d'Aro. The Festa de Primavera in Palafrugell - which is like Carnival but Palafrugell doesn't really celebrate the pre-lent festivals, preferring instead its own later 'spring festival'.

And then there were the Festa Majors for the local towns, the Havaneres in Calella de Palafrugell, the music festivals nearby, of which Cap Roig is the most celebrated, and the other local festivals like the circus festival in La Bisbal d'Emporda. And we didn't write up activities like visiting the waterparks or trips to Barcelona. And some weekends, it's just a joy to do nothing, just a local walk. And so on to year two...

Visit to Setcases
02 Dec 2013

Setcases village church in Spanish Pyrenees Setcases is a small town/village at the bottom of the valley that leads up to the Valter2000 ski-resort. We like to get at least one trip a year towards the Pyrenees, but it can mean a lot of driving - the actual distance to Setcases is about 120km or about 2 hours drive. But the local snow midweek combined with a need to go to Banyoles for some sports activities gave us the impetus to head towards the mountains to get some proper snow.

For skiers, the Costa Brava is relatively close to the mountains and it is feasible to have a day-trip skiing if you're not too worried about longer car journeys. Valter2000 is the closest ski area - resort would be too grand since it is more of a set of lifts and a cafe, with the main inhabited area down at Setcases - a small village a few kilometres on from Campodron.

Setcases fount in the snow The second closest would be Val de Nuria where you have to catch a train from Ribes de Freser up the mountain to the base station for skiing. Further on still are the Spanish ski resorts of Masella and La Molina, close to Puigcerda. Or you head into the high mountains of Andorra, or across the border into France.

Driving, the roads are relatively easy with dual carriageway all the way to Olot. The exception is the N260 link from Ribes de Freser to La Molina which is very windy and makes travel difficult to the bigger ski-towns near Puigcerda - these are generally easier from Barcelona northwards through the Tunel de Cadi.

Setcases, which translates as seven houses, is in fact bigger than it's name would suggest. The village is along the upper Ter valley from the larger town of Campodron. Campodron is worth visiting for it's museum of the Spanish Civil War and the stories and artifacts from Allied airmen who crashed and crossed the Pyrenees.

River Ter at Setcases with snow Setcases is then the last habitation before the ski-resort some 10km higher up the valley and sits at 1284m or so. The road up to the top of the valley is very bendy and we weren't prepared for full-on winter driving so Setcases was as a high up the valley as we wanted to go. On the drive we had snow flurries from Campodron, but it wasn't unitl just below Setcases that we reached the base of the snowline, though the road itself was clear.

So when we parked in the village, snow was turning everything white and there was sufficient on snow on the ground to make for snowball fights. The village is built in a bluff grey stone and feels like a proper mountain village with slate roofs and thick strong walls to the houses. The main village is built on the side of the hill with narrow lanes and streets connecting the terraces of houses and lots of restaurants and the odd hostal/hotel. There's a lot of walking possible in the area including walks up and over the Pyrenees into France or to the local high peaks (all at about 2200m or higher).

Our tour was more modest as we explored the streets and houses. The town has a number of village craft and produce shops selling local honey for instance. A rushing culvert runs alongside the main street and a small church hunkers down just above the rooftops of the main village. The signs suggested that the area was wealthy in older times, both for the pasture nearby, but also for local silver mines.

The snow though was the main reason for the visit. It's always surprising just how easy it is to get a complete change not just of scenery and landscape, but almost of climate just by travelling a couple of hours from the coast.

Other visits:  Ribes de Freser and skiing at Vall de Nuria - Puigcerda and Bourg-Madame - Canet d'Adri - Visit to Besalu and Banyoles - Mollo (Camprodon) - Pyrenees to France - Olot - capital of Garrotxa

Snow on the Costa Brava
27 Nov 2013

The general perception in the UK of places in the south of Europe, like the Costa Brava is one of year-round warm temperatures and mild winters, but in reality the weather can get colder. Looking out of the window at the moment and it's snowing. OK, that's big wet soggy snowflakes that aren't settling at the moment, but it's very unusual to have snow close the coast in November.

Snow itself is rare, but not so unusual. In general most years have the possibility of a day's snow and the occasional whiteout during December to February. When we were first looking for somewhere to live here, we arrived just after a snow flurry in February and were walking around Pals with snow on the ground. Generally though the snow doesn't settle, but if you we're close enough to the Pyrenees to be able to head to the mountains for a day to get a full winter experience.

The general winter situation is that nights are cold, but days can be bright and sunny and it can be sunny enough to keep a house warm without needing heating during the daylight. As it gets colder in the evenings many people just use a simple fire for warmth, rather than turn to full heating, at least until the deeper winter. So a piece of advice for anyone visiting during the winter period eg over Christmas, is to check whether the house or villa has central heating.

Empuries Greek and Roman remains
27 Nov 2013

Empuries on Costa Brava - Greek part and museum Situated just north of L'Escala, right on the coast itself are the ancient remains of the Greek and Roman towns of Empuries, the major port of the Costa Brava coast in the Ancient world, and along with Barcelona and Tarragona, one of the main Catalan Roman cities.

We'd seen the ruins from the sea-facing side walking between L'Escala and Sant Marti d'Empuries - a very pleasant Sunday afternoon stroll. What we hadn't realised until this year was the extent of the ruins on the other side. Only when we were returning from Cinc Claus on the walk from Escala, St Marti d'Empuries and beyond did we really start to get an impression of the size of the site.

Empuries reconstructed pillars by the Roman forum The whole site has now been dedicated as an archeological site with a modern museum with entrance only €3 for adults and free for children and we were allowed to take in our dog on a lead. What's initially surprising is that Empuries actually consists of two distinct towns. Prior to visiting I was under the impression that the Greeks came first and then their village was taken over by the Romans. In fact the Roman Empuries is distinctly separate from the older Greek part.

The history of the site is that it was first created as an outpost of the Phoenician's and then became a Greek colony and port trading inland with the neighbouring Iber tribes and villages (Empuries and Emporium as a shop share the same derivation). The Greek's travelled throughout the Mediterranean and had colonies in places like Sicily (Syrakuse). The Greek ruins run up the hill and there is a temptation to imagine a white walled village like Mykanos on the side of the Catalan Coast.

Empuries gardens connecting the Greek and Roman parts of the site For this visit though, we visited the Roman part first. This is marked by a long straight wall of about 300m in length, and surprisingly the wall is hollow - there would have been enough space for someone to walk through the middle. On the outside of the wall was the ampitheatre and stadium training ground, while the remaining parts of the town stood inside the walls. The Roman town itself was built within a rectangle with straight streets in a modern block arrangement.

Entering through the gate on the main wall, you walk down what would have been a main street where there would have been shops and traders. The stone flaggons on the floor still show the ruts from carts that would have passed through. At the end of this street is the main forum - the main town square. To help visitors, part of some of the buildings have been rebuilt and stone columns re-erected to give a sense of the town. Past the forum are the remains of the ancient baths and what would have been two or three large villas. Although many of the ruins have been excavated but there is still a large area to be explored.

Empuries stormy view to lEscala We then walked down the hill to the start of the Greek village built 500 years before the Romans arrived. While the Roman part was laid out in a regular fashion, the Greek city is much more higgedly piggedly with houses and spaces seemingly on top of each other. I always find it difficult to construct an image of a town or buildings just from their foundations, but even so it's very clear how large the town would have been. The Greek part also had it's own square and temple and area dedicated as a 'health resort'. The main Greek walls are at the bottom of the hill.

The site also has a modern museum where you can see artifacts. If anything we were slightly surprised at how little there was in the museum given the size of the main site. It is possible that much of the town was plundered when it was abandoned for Sant Marti in the early post-Roman era.

The geography of the site is also interesting in that when the Greeks and Romans were living in Empuries, the sea was a lot farther inshore. The ancient port wall that can be seen on the beach below Empuries would have protected a harbour inside the wall, where the beach is now (suggesting a sea level 3-4m higher than it is at present). In fact the sea was sufficiently high that neighbouring Sant Marti was an off-shore island at the time. Changes to sea-level combined with silting and shifting of the river Fluvia essentially rendered Empuries obsolete as a port, but it is interesting that there are so many Roman ports on the Mediterranean (eg Ephesus, Portus, Carthage, Frejus) which are now dry or a long way from the sea.

Neightbouring walks: Escala, St Marti d'Empuries and beyond - L'Escala Riells to sea cliffs and viewpoint of Montgo - Aiguamolls d'Emporda (Empuriabrava)

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Comments

adam@veggingoutwithadam.com
17 Feb 2014 19:46
What a great blog. I am planning a walking holiday in the region and wonder if you can recommend the best walking maps, like UK ordnance survey ones.

I shall be reading more of your walks over the coming days as we plan.

Many thanks
Adam
Saul
24 Feb 2014 17:25
Glad you're enjoying it. We have recommendations for maps in our 'Advice and FAQ' section
Saul
13 Jul 2017 12:46
Sorry I missed the comment, so I hope it's not too late - use the contact box if you'd like to send a message. For the coast, the GR92 is best and if you have driver you can just take it piece by piece. For hikers, around Cap de Creus is great, though it can be dry and hard walking in summer. For us, the stretch between Palamos and Palafrugell and on to Begur is the prettiest part of the whole Costa Brava and really good for walking. I'd probably also take the walk up and over Montgri, possibly starting at Pals, or L'Estartit to L'Escala. And though you said you prefer the coast, don't overlook inland routes as there are some wonderful villages and countryside out towards Girona, La Bisbal, or Olot.
Sven-Gunnar Furmark
24 May 2017 11:43
Hi,

My name is Sven Furmark. I am from Sweden. I plan to go to Costa Brava with some friends (totally about 10 people) for hiking for one week (5 walking days). We are experienced hikers and we usually walk 4-6 hours per day. We prefer to walk along the coast as much as possible. We plan to rent a house and travel to each days hiking with a bus & driver which we plan to book for the whole week. Which five hikes would you recommend for us.

Warm Regards
Sven
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